SUSE Leap 15 and KDE on a ZenBook

Having moved to Portland, it’s now time to start blogging again! Greetings to all my readers. In the works: a posting on a recent article about conceptual errors common to creationism and conspiracy theories. For now, a brief report on some current technology.

A while back, my 15″ MacBook Pro, from late 2012, stopped working. There is a defect in the graphics card which led to system restarts and shutdowns. At least I was off the hook–I thought those problems were a result of having dropped the machine at the cafe!

I used my work laptop, which ran Windows, but my personal project stagnated, and many of the tools I relied upon to supplement MS Office and other applications were not available on it. Thanks to Cygwin, I was able to get many of those tools back, including Emacs and LaTeX. When I knew I was going to leave my job, however, I needed to get a new laptop. The newer Apple laptops did not seem to me to be good value. They’re expensive! Moreover, the Apple software ecosystem is becoming more and more closed. Time was, one could run applications written for the Mac alongside X applications or other Unix applications ported to the Mac almost seamlessly. This has seemed more difficult to me in recent updates of OS X.

After a little research, I determined that there was a good chance that I could run Linux on an ASUS ZenBook UX330UA. After the retina screen on the Mac, I couldn’t go back to anything less than a QHD+ screen. I lugged the Mac around Europe for many months, or perhaps more notably, all around New York City, and it was an excellent travel companion. Nonetheless, I was ready for something even lighter. An SSD disk was another must-have.

For about half the price of a MacBook Pro with roughly the same components, The ZenBook running SUSE Leap 15 is a good machine for writing, coding, reading PDF’s, and web surfing. After trying out GNOME, I switched to KDE. The system is smooth, reliable, and fast. The primary drawback is the lack of integration with Apple’s calendar and other communication tools, but most of those can be accessed on the web. Printer support for Leap 15 is limited. Watching some videos requires adding some packages from the Packman repository. Another major drawback is that BibDesk is not available. Instead, I use ebib, an Emacs bibliography management package. Other than that, it’s a better experience than the Mac.

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