Installing Gerd Neu­ge­bauer’s Bibtool on OS X

April 9, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: DB engineering, Scripting 

I struggled for more hours than I would like to say trying to compile Gerd Neugebauer’s BibTool utility on my mac (OS 10.9.2). I kept running into problems with the kpathsea libraries. Not surprisingly, an old thread on the Mac OS-TeX mailing list provided the necessary insight. I’m reposting it here so that it might get better exposure on the Internet for those trying to do the same thing. Of course, someone who wasn’t shamelessly hacking away at it probably wouldn’t have had any problem at all . . .

BibTool is an amazing utility that does all those things we all wished BibDesk would do, but doesn’t: command line tools for removing fields, rewriting fields, grabbing references based on various criteria including regular expressions, pretty printing.

On Nov 23, 2009, at 1:49 PM, Jan Erik Moström wrote:

> I’m a bit slow (in all kind of ways ;) and I’m just trying to figure out the MacTeX distribution … one thing that that I would like to do is to install “bibtool” (not bibtools) but I can’t figure out how to do this in a simple way. Using Gerbens TeX distribution it was possible to use the i-installer but now I’m at a loss how to do it.
>

You can download the source and compile it yourself from http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/biblio/bibtex/utils/bibtool/
(Get the *.gz) file.
Once you have expanded the tar archive, copy the makefile.unx file to makefile, then run
make
sudo make install
sudo make install.man
This will place a working copy and manual pages in the /usr/local tree.
As long as you have /usr/local/bin in your path, things should work.

Of course, you have to have the developer tools to do this.
There are many options to set specific details during the compilation process, but I just did a vanilla “make” and
./bibtool -h
gave me the typical “usage” statement.

I’ve never used bibtool, don’t know how to use it, and don’t have any test files to ensure that it works in a real-life situation.
Otherwise, I now have a seemingly-functional version of “bibtool” that runs on X86_64 Snow Leopard.
I don’t guess that really helps you, but if you want it, send me a message off-list.

WikiWashed by WikiLeaks

“Greenwashing” is explained by the Greenwashing Index as “a company or organization spend[ing] more time and money claiming to be ‘green’ through advertising and marketing than actually implementing business practices that minimize environmental impact. It’s whitewashing, but with a green brush.” Hannah Klein Connolly offers a similar account of pinkwashing: “the activities of companies and groups that position themselves as leaders in the struggle to eradicate breast cancer while engaging in practices that may be contributing to rising rates of the disease.”

Taking greenwashing and pinkwashing as models, I define “Wikiwashing” as “representing a web site that is not a wiki as being a wiki.” What makes a web site a wiki is that anyone in the group of people primarily intended as the audience and user base of the wiki can edit the wiki web site. Ward Cunningham, a wiki pioneer, describes the wiki in the following manner:

A wiki is a body of ideas that a community is willing to know and  maintain. That community has every right to be cautiously selective  in what it will groom. This particular wiki [Cunningham's] has been blessed with thoughtful, diligent, diverse and open-minded volunteers, who have  invested years learning what works here and what doesn’t. When volunteers tire and depart, others take their place. I remain amazed  that this works without mechanically enforced authority. Possibly it  works because there is no mechanically enforced authority. In any  event, I remain grateful to all volunteers, past, present and future.

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Configuring WordPress for SSL is Maddening

December 11, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Blogging, Software devel, Tips and tricks 

I recently moved my WordPress installation to an “https://” address, that is, I now route all traffic (except the user’s first visit to a page) over a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). As the title of this blog posting suggests, the upgrade was maddening. I encountered a “too-many-redirects” error, which turns out to be a bug in WordPress 3.0.2. and probably other recent builds. Readers more interested in how I dealt with this problem should skip to the section entitled My experience with SSL, below. As will be seen, although I succeeded, I was not able to find a general solution to the problem. Those want to read more generally about my decision to use SSL connections should start at the section immediately below and continue to read until the end.

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